Patents and IP

World's first electromagnetic electrolyzer

Gaseous oxygen is paramagnetic, but they move too fast to be affected by magnets. However, magnets can easily attract oxygen bubbles while in liquid. In other words, a magnetic field around electrodes can influence the direction of gas bubbles. In the electromagnetic electrolyzer, gas bubbles are attracted to the magnetic field and leave the electrodes' surface as soon as they are forming.

The electromagnetic field is created due to the flow of electrons through the inner copper core of the electrocatalyst and the geometric positioning of the electrodes. No separate energy is used. It has a remarkable influence in creating a ‘Magnetohydrodynamic’ effect in order to reduce electrolytic polarization and increase the convection phenomenon, current density, and Lorentz force.

The magnetic field keeps the electrodes’ active surface area clear of gas bubbles and reduces IR drop. Gas bubbles sticking to the surface of the electrodes is a common problem in commercial electrolyzers and leads to inefficiency.

The electrolyzer produces significantly less heat compared to commercial electrolyzers due to its high-tech electrolyzer stack materials, reinvented interior design, efficient catalyst with copper-based electrodes instead of conventional nickel electrodes. Copper has significantly less electrical resistance than nickel.

Type of patent: PCT

Year of application: 2017

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

The groundbreaking nickel-copper-iron core-shell electrocatalyst

The tri-metal electrocatalyst is inexpensive but has superior catalytic activity and durability compared to traditional catalyst.

The catalyst is active for both oxygen and hydrogen evolution reaction and mass production friendly. It is the most cost-effective and efficient alternative to platinum and iridium-based catalysts used in PEM electrolyzers.

Type of patent: PCT

Year of application: 2017

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

Synthetic methane gas from renewable electricity and tap water

The technology involves a simple low-cost reactor that converts hydrogen gas into synthetic methane gas without requiring any external energy.

Electrolysis of water initially produces atomic hydrogen (H). Atomic hydrogen is unstable thus it bonds with another hydrogen atom and becomes hydrogen molecule (H2). Fresh hydrogen molecules are also slightly unstable and can react with solid carbon (C) under the right condition to form hydrocarbon gas, such as methane (CH4).

Amorphous carbon is more reactive than graphite and other forms of carbon. The reactor produces a mixture of gas comprising hydrogen and methane.

Type of patent: PCT

Year of application: 2017

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

The high-pressure and compact electrolyzer

The technology can compress both hydrogen and oxygen gas up to 700 Bar. The pressure compensating system can equalize gas pressure in two different gas chambers by controlling the flow rate and reducing or increasing the size of the chambers without any energy input.

The electro-hydraulic valve is part of Hymeth's new high-pressure electrolyzer technology. The technology can be also beneficial in other industrial applications, for example maintaining the same fluid pressure in two separate pipelines.

Meanwhile, competing electrolyzers can compress hydrogen up to 50 bar and require additional gas compressors to reach 300 bar, a standard pressure for storing Hydrogen.

Type of patent: PCT

Year of application: 2018

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

The energy saving cooling system for efficient heat exchange

The cooling system can support both liquid and compressed air cooling in a high-pressure electrolyzer or battery stack without any modification. The system can also efficiently use ambient air as a coolant and reduce the energy consumption of the heat-exchange process.

Type of patent: PCT

Year of application: 2018

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

The 19-inch rack for electronic and electrochemical devices

The innovative 19-inch rack uses ambient air for cooling and reduces the energy consumption of the electrolyzer or fuel cell stack's cooling system.

This breathable rack can keep the temperature ideal without requiring any fan to draw cooler air into the rack from the outside, expel warm air from inside, and move air across a heat sink to cool a particular component.

The innovative design also allows us to capture the heat emitted from electronic equipment inside the box. The recovered heat from a larger system can be used to warm up households or offices. This new way to stack modules of electrolyzers in interconnecting racks will allow scale up the system quickly for heavy industries.

Type of patent: EU

Year of application: 2019

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

The compact, safe and efficient electrical connection to transfer high current

The designs allow us to transfer a large amount of current to the multiple cells in an electrolyzer system and ensures a better current transfer with minimum heat generation.

Type of patent: EU

Year of application: 2019

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

A cost-efficient and carbon-negative process to produce sustainable CO2 from abundant Calcium Carbonate for synthetic hydrocarbon fuel production.

Type of patent: EU

Year of application: 2019

Inventor: Sumon Bishwas

Hymeth has two product lines for two different applications, Hyaeon™ and Hynace™. Both Hyaeon and Hynace share the same first syllable to mark they are part of the same Hymeth family.

Hyaeon

hyaeon.com
In commercial use since 2017
Originator: Sumon Bishwas

Hyaeon is a combination of the words Hymeth and Aeon which incorporates meanings such as timeless and vital force. The combination of the two words mean that Hyeaon is an invention that will sustain over time and a major breakthrough in the way we consume our energy.

Hynace

hynace.com
In commercial use since 2019
Originator: Sumon Bishwas

Hynace is a combination of the words Hymeth and furnace. Hynace can also mean a royal product for sounding similar to “highness”